FATBIKING IN GEILO

Geilo, in the Municipality of Hol, is a well-known tourist destination for cross country skiing. 
We are proud of the variety and quality of our vast network of cross country ski trails.

Cross country ski trails are made for cross country skiing. 
The administration and maintenance of the trails is very costly. We are talking about millions of Norwegian kroner each year.
The Municipality covers 50% of the required costs; the other half is covered by voluntary contributions from local businesses, Geilo’s residents and tourists who may own a hut here.
People who enjoy cross country skiing, make an effort to secure the financing, so they themselves and others can enjoy many kilometers of perfectly groomed tracks.
Do you want to contribute?
If you have a Norwegian mobile phone you can text GEILO to 2490 and contribute directly with kr 300.-

A fatbike is considered a guest on the cross country skiing trails.
In the right conditions (i.e. hard packed snow) a fatbike will not leave a trace, and it shouldn’t be a problem to share the trails with skiers.
If the tracks are soft, freshly groomed or covered with new snow, even the widest tires will sink in, leave deep marks, damage the tracks and disappoint the skiers.
In these conditions you should definitely be skiing, not biking :-).

In Geilo it is all about cooperation!
We know that it takes mutual understanding and creative thinking to avoid conflicts BEFORE they arise.
We just don’t want grumpy faces in the mountains!
We want everybody to thrive here.

Geilo Aktiv/ Fatbike Geilo for example has joined forces with Geilo-Husky to offer a fun trail-alternative, away from the skiing tracks. It starts right next to the ski center at Geilolia/ Vestlia Resort and runs along, and on the lake (Ustedalsfjorden). Read more about the trail HERE.

If you ride a fatbike on the ski tracks, you should use common sense and be a polite, humble and grateful guest.

FATiquette

1. Only use the cross country ski trails if the conditions are right, i.e. when you don’t leave traces.
If you have to get off and push your bike, the snow is too soft and you absolutely shouldn’t be on the trails.
If the tracks of your tires are deeper than an inch or if you are having a hard time riding in a straight line, it is too soft to be on the cross country ski trails.

2. Keep to the right and give way to all other users when riding (don't ride side-by-side with all of your buddies). 
Leave enough room for skiers to pass. 
Skiers don't have disk-brakes, metal frames or handlebars that stick out, but you do!

3. Allow the track time to set after grooming, and before riding. 
Ride on the firmest part of the track.

4. Never ride on or in the classic tracks (only cross them if absolutely necessary)

5. Be friendly and polite when you meet skiers. Fat bikers are the newest trail users. 
Be a good example and an ambassador for the sport. Your behavior will affect general opinion about fatbikes on cross country trails.
Be considerate and open to suggestions from other trail users. 
Educate other riders; encourage them to follow the rules, too.

6. Avoid highly frequented cross country trails and the busiest times. On weekends, it’s best to stay away from the most popular destinations, at least during the middle of the day (avoid for exampel Ustedalsfjorden, Ruperanden, Budalen, Prestholt).

7. Be visible at all times. Wear reflective material on both the front and rear of your body, use lights both on the front and rear of your bike (front light white and rear light/ blinker red). Use extreme caution when riding in the dark.

8. Plan ahead for your trip. Adjust your ambitions to your level of fitness, current snow-conditions and the weather. Snow- and weather-conditions can change quickly. Always carry extra clothing, food, water, tools, spares and your mobile telephone. Let people know where you are going and when you expect to return.

9. Be prepared when you go out riding.
Winter travel in the backcountry requires carrying proper gear and dressing properly. Cater for bad weather and cold even on short trips. 
Be self-sufficient.
Understand changing conditions. A new snowfall or increasing temperatures can make the return trip more difficult and you might damage the trails. 
Tracks can be covered, hard snow can turn to slush, frozen rivers and lakes can melt. 
Always check the weather forecast and be aware of how changing conditions might affect your route. 
Seek information about the safety of ice travel. Riding on frozen water can be extremely dangerous. 
Be aware: some lakes in the area have changing water levels during the winter!
Don’t take any chances!

10. Contribute to find and prepare alternative trails for fatbiking. There are many snowmobile tracks next to or parallel to the cross country ski tracks. 
Feel free to share your routes with other fatbikers.

11. Riding your bike on alpine skiing tracks is not allowed.